Why and how to joyfully move our butts around town, without mucking the place up.

Pages with tag Electric Cars

  • "DRIVETHEARC" EV fast charging corridor breaks ground in Northern California From Monterey to Lake Tahoe, 50 New EV Fast Chargers to be Installed at over 20 Locations
  • 2011 Nissan LEAF Press Kit: At a Glance 2011 Nissan LEAF(TM) - A New Era of Mobility Begins With "No Gas, No Tailpipe" 5-Passenger EV
  • 2011 Nissan LEAF Press Kit: Gallery 2011 Nissan LEAF(TM) - A New Era of Mobility Begins With "No Gas, No Tailpipe" 5-Passenger EV
  • 2011 Nissan LEAF Press Kit: Overview 2011 Nissan LEAF(TM) - A New Era of Mobility Begins With "No Gas, No Tailpipe" 5-Passenger EV
  • 2017 Chevrolet Bolt EV First Drive Review -- Transport Evolved Can General Motors be trusted with electric car production since they axed the EV1. GM's first attempt to remedy that reputation was the Chevy Volt (with a V). The Chevy Bolt is their second attempt, and does a reasonably good job of being a great electric car, and remedying that reputation. It has a 7 kiloWatt AC charging system for an 8 hour recharge time. The DC Fast charging system is a $750 option, stupidly.
  • 2017 Honda Clarity EV begins arriving at California and Oregon Honda dealerships <p>Honda, nice try, if you'd delivered this in 2011 or 2012 or even 2013 there'd be a market for this car. Today, you're competing against the Chevy Bolt EV, the Tesla Model 3, the 2018 Nissan Leaf, etc, all of which have more range than what you're offering. As we <a href="/ev-charging/range-confidence/5-autonomy.html">point out elsewhere</a> total driving range autonomy makes one car more valuable than another. By offering an 80ish mile range Honda is not making a competitive offering versus the other automakers.</p>
  • 2017 Hyundai Ioniq Hybrid and Electric models soon to be available to U.S. consumers
  • 2017 VW e-Golf offers improved range and fuel economy This is a significant improvement over the current VW e-Golf. Improved driving range will be the common theme the next couple years. While they aren't announcing the MSRP it's possible VW will do as Hyundai, and instead of going for 200+ miles range at a $30-35,000 MSRP, they'll go for a lower MSRP instead.
  • 24 Hrs. With A Chevy Bolt: In-Depth Look By A Tesla Owner <p>A Tesla Model S owner managed to snag a Chevy Bolt EV for 24 hours. He isn't doing a comparison between the cars because the Model S and Bolt EV are very different market niche's. What he's doing is an in-depth examination of the Bolt EV.</p>
  • Available in August, Honda announces 2017 Clarity Electric lease price at $269 a month <p>The Honda Clarity Electric may be a waste of time - 2011 called, and they want their electric car. That is, the Honda Clarity Electric has specifications (80 mile range) that were hot in 2011, but are has-been today given the 200+ mile range of the Chevy Bolt EV or the Tesla Model 3. This lease price means you're not getting a lower price in exchange for sub-par capabilities.</p> <p>At the same time we must recognize that Honda has until now refused to deliver a credible electric car in anything but "compliance car" quantities. Just enough Honda Fit EV's were made to produce enough electric car sales to earn enough ZEV credits so they could stay in the business of selling gasoline vehicles. This new car perhaps represents a change in tune for Honda given their long term focus on fuel cell vehicle research. Except that we see in the press release below that the Honda Clarity Electric, just as the Fit EV, is limited to California and Oregon, and is therefore a "compliance car" until proven otherwise.</p> <p>Another item of note is that it supports fast charging -- using the Combo Charging System. This is the first time for a Japanese automaker to be selling (er.. leasing) a car with Combo Charging System. The Honda Fit EV was not delivered with fast charging. In general the Japanese Automotive Market requires CHAdeMO, because that system was developed in Japan long before the Combo Charging System (CCS) was developed. CHAdeMO charging infrastructure in Japan is ubiquitous, but the technology failed to take off in the market largely because the Society for Automotive Engineers choose to take a different direction. See <a href="/ev-charging/range-confidence/chap8-tech/ev-dc-fast-charging-standards-chademo-ccs-sae-combo-tesla-supercharger-etc.html"></a></p>
  • BMW Group, Daimler, Ford and Volkswagen Group plan joint venture for ultra-fast charging along major highways in Europe German car companies, plus Ford Motors, join together to promote a much higher charging rate for DC Fast Charging. So far the highest rate is Tesla's 120+ kiloWatt Supercharger. These companies propose a 350 kiloWatt rate for the Combo Charging System. Doing so would cut charging time to 10 minutes or so for a complete recharge, which would begin to support proper road trips.
  • Bolloré awarded City of Los Angeles contract to launch BlueLA, a revolutionary electric car sharing service Bolloré offers car sharing services, using their own electric car, in Indianapolis, Paris France, and elsewhere. They're now bringing electric car sharing to Los Angeles.
  • Chevrolet delivers first Bolt EVs to customers The long-awaited Chevy Bolt EV is starting to be delivered, with the first three being delivered through a Chevrolet dealership in Fremont. That dealership has a large solar panel system out front with integrated electric car charging, FWIW. Coincidentally it's located within spitting distance of the Tesla Motors factory also in Fremont.
  • Detroit Electric A start-up electric car company seemingly intent on replicating Tesla Motors.
  • ECOmove QBEAK electric car
  • ECOmove QBEAK electric car, with bio-methanol fuel cell for 500 miles driving range
  • First automated vehicle in New York, an Audi <p>What Audi has done is achieve the first license for automated vehicle testing in New York. They held a technology demonstration in Albany NY, of the Audi Highway Pilot technology, showcasing their "Level 3" capabilities.</p>
  • Ford announces ambitious China electrification strategy; confirms two new EV's for China, broad range by 2025 Ford Motors routinely makes big claims about plans to electrify their vehicle line-up. The details are important, because Ford rarely means fully battery-electric vehicles but instead a hybrid or plug-in hybrid drive-train. In this case one of the two new EV's is a PHEV (plug-in hybrid) rather than BEV (battery EV). While this is a step towards the goal of a fully electric (no fossil fuels) the vehicle fleet, that's nowhere near what Ford is promising. When Ford promises 'to electrify 70% of Ford nameplates sold' in China, that simply means 70% of their vehicle line will have an option for an electric something-or-other in the drive-train, which could mean a simple hybrid drive-train. It doesn't even promise 70% of their sales will have electric components in the drive-train, but 70% of the vehicle line.
  • Fremont City Council approves Tesla Motors factory expansion plans Tesla Motors is preparing their factory for the jump to 500,000 cars per year in order to satisfy Tesla Model 3 sales demand.
  • Fully Charged tests the 40 kiloWatt-hour Renault Zoe Robert Llewellyn (Fully Charged) test drives the new Renault Zoe in Portugal. Where the original had a 24 kWh pack, the new version has a 41 kWh pack, giving it over 180 miles in the summer, and 120 miles in cold conditions. The bigger battery fits in exactly the same footprint and they'll even allow the new battery to be used in the older Renault Zoe.
  • GEELY AND DETROIT ELECTRIC ENTER STRATEGIC PARTNERSHIP TO CO-DEVELOP PURE ELECTRIC VEHICLES FOR CHINESE MARKET A start-up electric car company seemingly intent on replicating Tesla Motors.
  • GM produces first round of self-driving Chevrolet Bolt EV test vehicles <p>For the first time, autonomous self-driving cars have been built using mass-production methodology. As we can tell via the pictures released with this press release, they built some kind of assembly line for this purpose. The assembly line clearly isn't "high-end" (no robots), but it's an assembly line, letting them claim to have used mass-production methods. GM is deploying the 130 vehicles to test fleets in San Francisco, Scottsdale and Detroit.</p> <p>Another thing to see in these pictures is that these cars have many sensors, including a whole sensor package mounted on the roof, and some sensors at the side near the front. The press release talks about LIDAR, cameras and other sensors, as well as computing equipment.</p>
  • GM's assembly line for producing Self-Driving Chevrolet Bolt EV Test cars <p>Yesterday GM released news that a hundred or so Self-Driving Chevy Bolt EV's were being manufactured on an assembly line, and being shipped to test fleets around the USA. They described this as a milestone, as the first self-driving car to be built with mass-production techniques. We've found a video that goes over the assembly line.</p> <p>This is clearly not a robotized modern assembly line. Instead of an building the cars from scratch, they are attaching parts to a pre-built chassis. It looks like Engineering team members are doing some of the assembly.</p> <p>The other thing to note is the size of the computing cluster, and that it takes up a significant amount of cargo space. As advanced as their self-driving technology surely is, they still haven't shrunk the equipment down to where it fits into the woodwork.</p>
  • Honda EV Plus
  • Honda Electrified! Clarity Plug-in Hybrid and Clarity Electric unveiled at 2017 New York International Auto Show
  • Is General Motors' Policy on DC Quick Charging Slowing Chevrolet Bolt EV Adoption Rates? (Transport Evolved) Chevy Bolt EV sales are not taking off like a rocket making people think the car is a failure. On Transport Evolved, Nikki Gordon-Bloomfield suggests the cause is GM's lackluster support for building charging infrastructure. Clearly Tesla's big sales advantage is that the Supercharger network is so well developed. CCS fast charging infrastructure is at least 3 years behind other DC fast charging methods. Since it is not as widely available, the CCS fast charging standard is less attractive than either CHAdeMO or Supercharger which are much more available. GM doesn't help by steadfastly refusing to participate in building fast charging infrastructure.
  • Marc Tarpenning - Tesla's High Speed Innovation at 2017 Product Leader Summit <p>If you pay closely to your electric vehicle history, you may be aware that Elon Musk is nothing more than a co-founder of Tesla Motors. Martin Eberhard and Marc Tarpenning started Tesla Motors, with Elon Musk joining shortly afterward as the Angel Investor. This talk is by Marc Tarpenning talking at Stanford University to a group of entrepenuerial people. </p> <p>Martin and Marc had built and sold a previous company, and were looking for a new challenge. They decided to look at the Oil industry, that is to disrupt the Oil Industry out of existence. The primary place Oil plays is transportation, specifically for cars and light trucks. It's unrealistic to use biofuels -- for example corn-based-ethanol would require more arable land than exists in the USA to fuel the vehicles used in the USA. On the other hand, electric cars can be powered by the solar panels on the roof of the house. See <a href="/energy-transportation/solar-ev-nirvana.html"></a></p> <p>They chose to build a sports car first because it's an area where they could more easily compete than other market segments. The electric drive was able to outpace gasoline powered cars because of "100% torque at 0 RPM". The Roadster doesn't do so well at a race track because they knew high speed wasn't so important for daily driving, and instead the 0-60 miles/hr time was most important.</p> <p>The real plan was to make an extremely compelling attractive car at the high end, and then move towards the Sedan market.</p>
  • Myers Motors NmG (formerly known as the "Sparrow")
  • Nissan Leaf spyshots helps Transport Evolved make educated analysis <p>A Transport Evolved viewer in Europe happened upon a Nissan Leaf in the wild, that happened to be at a charging station, shared the pictures with the show, letting them make educated guesses about the car. The Nissan Leaf still has dual charging ports, still sporting CHAdeMO, but the AC charge port was larger implying that Nissan a switch to the Type 2 port for Europe instead of the J1772 port. Doing so will make the Leaf more compatible with Europe's charging infrastructure. </p> <p>The other detail is that this car seemed to allow a maximum 160+ miles range, implying it has a 40 kiloWatt-hour battery pack. Hurm... is Nissan going to wait on offering the 60 kiloWatt-hour battery size required for a 200+ mile range? </p> <p>The competition is over what? Will more market share be had with a lower priced car that still offers a significant range boost? What if a 160-180 mile range 40 kWh Leaf can be bought for significantly less than the 238 mile range 60 kWh Chevy Bolt EV or the Tesla Model 3? Would that mean more Leaf buyers because it's much less expensive?</p> <p>On the other hand, Nissan has long talked about offering multiple battery pack capacities, and has shown promo videos of a Leaf with a 60 kWh pack. It's far more likely that Nissan will offer both 40 kWh and 60 kWh capacities on the Leaf.</p>
  • Polestar announces new management team to develop electrified performance brand for Volvo Cars <p>Volvo is spinning off a new company intended to enter the Electric Performance Car market. </p>
  • Reva, an electric City Car made in India
  • Tesla Model 3 spoted 'testing' on I-280 near Tesla HQ A blue Tesla Model 3 is filmed in the wild, if nothing else letting us know these things actually exist. Going by the road signs this is I-280 near Tesla's headquarters. Not much to say, but for those of us waiting to place our orders this is a good sign.
  • Tesla raises cash for Model 3 launch, from Chinese company Tencent Tesla Motors has to spend $2.5 billion before July to launch the Model 3. As with the Model S and Model X launches, Tesla Motors is going through deep cash burn for capital expenditures to build up capacity to launch the new model. Making ends meet requires selling stock to raise capital from investors. This time that included Tencent, a large Chinese company. That company is backing a self-driving-car startup, Nio. Tesla Motors is advanced into developing this technology of course, so does Tencent intend to drive a merger? Tencent spent $1.78 billion buying their stake in Tesla.
  • The Slaby-Beringer electric car -- Innovative and revolutionary in its day
  • Volvo and Chinese automaker Geely partner on electric vehicle technology companies <p>Volvo Cars and Geely Holding are announcing two joint ventures to rapidly develop next generation electrified vehicle technology. GV Automobile Technology will be 50/50 owned, with operations in China and Gothenburg Sweden. The LYNK car line will be manufactured by LYNK & CO, a newly formed JV between Volvo and Geely.</p> <p>According to <a href="https://www.reuters.com/article/us-china-autos-geely-volvo-idUSKBN1AK057">Reuters</a>, they'll be sharing engine technology as well, and that Geely purchased Volvo from Ford seven years ago. </p> <p>This is not about Volvo switching to an electric-only strategy. <a href="https://www.dezeen.com/2017/07/05/volvo-first-major-car-company-scrap-combustion-engine-design-transport-news/">In July</a>, the company said it would fully <strong>electrify</strong> its model line by 2019. This announcement with Geely obviously sets Volvo on that path. However the key word is ELECTRIFY, not ELECTRIC. That word lets an automaker weasel around, making it sound like they're moving to an electric drive train, when in reality an ELECTRIFIED drivetrain could be a gasoline engine with mild electric assist.</p> <p>It is a big deal that Volvo's total model lineup will have some kind of electrification. It would have been far more significant if Volvo had announced an all-electric-only plan. Instead, they'll stick with plug-in hybrid or even more mild electrification for now. The company is pledging to launch five all-electric vehicles over the next few years.</p>
  • Why you shouldn't buy a battery-electric car? Doesn't hold water <p>This Chevy Volt owner (note - Plug-in Hybrid) tells us he is frequently asked why he doesn't own a Tesla. In other words, why not own a battery electric car, and why instead to own a plug-in hybrid? The obvious first answer is that the Volt and other PHEV's are nowhere near as expensive as a Tesla Model S or Model X, and therefore regular folks can buy a Volt. That's a completely understandable answer, though will change later this year as the Tesla Model 3 comes on the market. </p> <p>Next reason - usable driving range for road trips. That is, when the Volt runs out of battery power you just keep on driving because the gasoline engine kicks in. You can even never touch the charging port and drive forever on gasoline. Or, that's what the guy in the video says. Too bad that's an incorrect idea. </p> <p>Gasoline vehicle owners can have range anxiety because they can be just as stuck on the side of the road having run out of fuel. It's called "running out of gas" and happens to people all the time. For more information on Range Anxiety see: <a href="/ev-charging/range-confidence/chap1/1-brief-history-range-anxiety.html"></a></p> <p>It boils down to refueling time, effective trip speed, and refueling/recharging infrastructure. Gasoline does have a very fast refueling time and therefore effective trip speed is high with gasoline. Effective trip speed means the distance traveled divided by travel time factoring in everything including pee breaks, food breaks and refueling breaks. As more DC fast charging infrastructure is built, electric car effective trip speed will increase. The guy is right that currently the balance tips towards plug-in hybrids if your primary goal is optimum trip speed on road trips. To understand the calculations see <a href="/ev-charging/range-confidence/chap4-charging/4-charging-rates.html"></a></p> <p>For most of us road trips are a secondary use of our car, and the primary use is around-town driving. That means we don't need to optimize for road trip effective speed, but we need to optimize for around-town driving. See <a href="/ev-charging/range-confidence/chap4-charging/4-charge-rate-needed.html"></a></p> <p>What about battery swapping as the solution for increasing charging time? It's not a good choice that failed in the market. See <a href="/ev-charging/range-confidence/chap8-tech/battery-swapping.html"></a></p>
  • Winter test of Kia Soul EV - Bjorn Nyland Bjorn Nyland, best known for his many videos about Tesla Model S ownership in Norway, recently tested the Kia Soul EV in Norway's harsh winter.
  • Winter test of Renault Zoe 210 Bjorn Nyland, best known for his many videos about Tesla Model S ownership in Norway, recently tested the Renault Zoe in Norway's harsh winter.
  • Winter test of the VW eGolf 24 kWh - Bjorn Nyland Bjorn Nyland puts the eGolf through its paces in the Norway winter.
  • Zapworld and their electric vehicles (Xebra, etc)